God’s Word Preached

We are committed to the faithful, expositional preaching of the Bible, which simply means the reading, explaining, and application of the Word of God to our hearts and lives—verse by verse, week in and week out (2 Timothy 3:16–4:5). Listen in and be nourished with us on the riches of the Scriptures.

The man who would aspire to the office of elder must be one who gives evidence of a transformed life. Over and above any giftedness or ability, he must be above reproach in his character as the example to the flock.
Too often our hearts are distracted from the glorious preoccupation of worshipping the Lord. The allurements of the world, the cares of life, and the pain of loss all have the tendency to pull us down into a spiral of despair and discontent. Psalm 103 calls us to speak to ourselves and call ourselves to remembrance of who God is and what He has done for us that we might be compelled to lift our eyes to the One who is worthy of all our praise.
A man who is qualified for the office of elder is a man of exemplary character. When defining what this looks like, it's helpful to note what it doesn't. What sort of character disqualifies a man from eldership?
All too often, churches look for leaders who are extraordinary communicators, have CEO management skills, and a track record of results. But the Lord Jesus Christ is more concerned about a man's character than his charisma. He has given us a list of what a man must be if he is to manage the household of God, and it begins with an evaluation of his own home.
How do I grow in Christ-likeness? Sanctification—the process of becoming more like Christ—is a profound mystery: God alone causes the growth (1 Cor. 3.6-7), and yet Christians are commanded to pursue their own spiritual growth (Php. 2.13, 2 Pet. 3.18). How can that be? More than that, what are we supposed to do about it? The apostle Paul answers that question for us, but maybe not in a way we might expect.
The Bible is far from silent on the issue of church leadership. We should expect this to be the case since the church is made up of those whom the Lord Jesus purchased with His own blood. He said, "I will build my church, and the gates of hell will not prevail against it," and His blueprint for leadership provides for a sure foundation.
The truth of the Gospel is a treasure that God revealed in His time and in His way. What the Lord entrusted to the Apostles was proclaimed and codified in His word so that we might pass it on to the next generation.
The Apostle Paul referred to the gospel and all it's implications as a precious treasure that must not only be protected and proclaimed, but passed on to others. In the introduction to this little letter, we find the reason why this message is so priceless and how we can find assurance of our salvation and grace to be transformed.
Among those who claim to have the truth are many who allegedly speak for God and even use the title "apostle." How can we know someone is a genuine spiritual leader? The Apostle Paul provides a template for those who possess the qualities that are necessary in a true servant of Christ.
There are so many voices in our world claiming to have truth. Many promote the postmodern idea that truth is relative, and yet demand that others conform to their version of truth! God has revealed His truth in His word, and once it invades our hearts, it changes us from the inside out.
The Missions Mandate Many Christians argue that if God is sovereign in salvation, there is no need to share the gospel. This common fallacy fails to understand the biblical fact that God has not only ordained the ends of salvation, but the means of it. The means is the necessity for Christians to take the gospel to the ends of the earth in obedience to the Great Commission.

Marriage Matters

September 12, 2021
What is Marriage Really? There no shortage of controversy as well as ignorance when it comes to marriage. What is it, what is for, and what should marriage mean to me? The Scriptures give us authoritative insight and instruction from God himself that informs us, equips us, and encourages us to safeguard this most precious of human institutions—especially in our own homes, where we need it most.
That You May Believe John's epilogue balances out the prologue to his Gospel and brings it full circle, pointing us back to 1:1 where we were introduced to the eternal Word who took on flesh and dwelt among us. Jesus is glorious, and John wrote about Him to show who He is. When we believe in Him as the Christ, the Son of God, we have life in His name.
Follow Me The Lord always deals first and foremost with our hearts. But once we've confessed our sin and reaffirmed our live for Him, He calls us to stop focusing on our failure and get back to the work He has called us to do.
"Do You Love Me?" What do you do when you sin? Like Peter, we often deal wrongly with our guilt, either trying to ignore it or somehow atone for it. Jesus comes to us as gently as He did to this wayward disciple, reminding us that the gospel is just as powerful to keep us as it was to save us.
The Power of God for Salvation "The Gospel is the power of God for salvation" (Romans 1:16). It is the message that was revealed to the Apostles who saw the risen Lord and that was written down in order "that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in His name."
Jesus is the one who is called "Faithful and True" (Rev. 19:11). Because He kept His promise to lay His life down and to take it up again, "all the promises of God find their 'Yes' in Him" (2 Cor. 1:20). Not only did King Jesus deliver on His promises through His finished work, but as He appears as the risen Lord, He continues to deliver on His promises to this day. He does so through His followers as He has commissioned and empowered them for their gospel-spreading mission.
Throughout His public ministry, Jesus told His disciples repeatedly that He would be crucified, buried, and be raised the third day. John reports two scenes at the empty tomb, and two fulfilled promises that once again reveal the majesty and authority of King Jesus.
The writer of Hebrews says that our Lord Jesus Christ left the glory of heaven and took on humanity "that through death he might destroy the one who has the power of death, that is, the devil, and deliver all those who through fear of death were subject to lifelong slavery." He did this by tasting death Himself. Yet, even the grave could not hold the Son of God. The King who conquered death offers us eternal life in Him.
The cross is the culmination of the mission for which Jesus was sent by the Father, and for which He willingly came into the world to accomplish. To those who are still dead in their trespasses and sins, the cross of Christ is the sad end to a misguided idealist. But to those who have eyes to see, it is the height of glory as God's plan of redemption is completed in the death of His Son.
Even as Jesus is delivered over into the hands of wicked men to be crucified, His majesty and authority are displayed as He fulfills multiple prophetic Scriptures concerning the Messiah. He leaves no doubt that He is indeed the Christ, the Son of God, and as such, the only Savior for men and the King of kings who is worthy of all glory.
Spiritual immaturity is a problem because God commands Christians to grow (2 Pet. 3:18), but also because true spiritual life inherently includes growth (2 Cor. 3:18). More importantly, however, spiritual immaturity could be an indication that we don't actually belong to Christ at all. For all these reasons, it is crucial for those who claim to be Christians that they be clear on the essentials of Christian truth and living, and that they be growing from that foundation into greater degrees of Christlikeness.
The warning passage of Hebrews 6 has long been one of the most sobering passages in all of Scripture because of its straightforward warning: if you fall away from the faith, you cannot be saved and there is nothing left for you but hell. What does it mean to fall away, and how do I know if I am a candidate? Thankfully, the Word of God is not silent about this, but has given several points by which to examine ourselves to see if we are, in fact, in the faith.
God's love for sinners was displayed in detail as His Son was rejected and condemned. Jesus was neither a victim of circumstances, nor what some have called 'cosmic child abuse,' but the One who declared His own authority to lay down His life and to take it up again. Because He was willingly condemned to suffer and die, there is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.
As Jesus is led before Pilate, it becomes clear very quickly that it is not He who is on trial. He is the sinless, sovereign, supreme King, and His kingdom is not of this world. It is a kingdom defined by truth-the truth that sets men free. Pilate's response to Jesus was typical of the unbelieving world...how will you respond to the King?
As Jesus was facing the illegal interrogation of the Jewish leaders, Peter's allegiance was being tested. Through the most unlikely means, the authority of the King shines through the darkness of dead hearts and a heartbreaking denial.

Many think that Jesus was a victim of circumstances; a good man who found himself embroiled in controversy that led to a sad end. But nothing could be further from the truth. Jesus displayed His authority over nature, sickness, sin, and even death. Once again He displays His authority by orchestrating His own arrest.

It seems that almost everyone in the world (and in the church) is constantly calling for unity. Unity among Christians is indeed not only God's desire, but His command; and it is one of the primary requests the Lord Jesus is bringing before the throne of grace on behalf of His own. But what exactly does this unity look like, and what is the basis for it? Jesus answers these questions and more in the third and final request of His high priestly prayer.