God's ways are often seen as foolishness to men. When things don't seem to make sense, appearing either too extraordinary for our human sensibilities to accept, or just too ordinary to be God's handiwork, we dismiss them in disbelief. But what if God does what He does in the ways He does for that very reason, in order that we might be forced to bow the knee in humble submission and admit that "the foolishness of God is wiser than men" (1 Cor. 1:25)? Take a look at Christmas with fresh eyes and see the wisdom of God.
God's ways are often seen as foolishness to men. When things don't seem to make sense, appearing either too extraordinary for our human sensibilities to accept, or just too ordinary to be God's handiwork, we dismiss them in disbelief. But what if God does what He does in the ways He does for that very reason, in order that we might be forced to bow the knee in humble submission and admit that "the foolishness of God is wiser than men" (1 Cor. 1:25)? Take a look at Christmas with fresh eyes and see the wisdom of God.
Pride is the underlying disease that affects each and every one of us and colors everything we think, do, and say. How do we address it? As a skilled physician of the soul, the Apostle Paul shows us by example what it looks like to deny ourselves and to take up our cross and follow Jesus.
Our natural tendency is to think too highly of ourselves and too lowly of others. We somehow deceive ourselves into thinking that our own wisdom, talents, and accomplishments are to our own credit, and set ourselves up as judges of others. But the word of the cross calls us to recognize that we have nothing we did not receive, and when we die to ourselves and embrace the reality of being in Christ, we find that all things belong to us by virtue of belonging to Him. This changes everything, beginning with how we think about ourselves and others.